TICKET GIVEAWAY!! This Friday at The Mothlight, the legendary Mac McCaughan (of Merge Records / Superchunk fame) will be here supporting his newest solo release "Non-Believers". Comment on this post for a chance to win a pair of free tix! www.facebook.com/events/492286907576375/ ... See MoreSee Less

Superchunk frontman Mac McCaughan was ready to take a collection of unused tracks he had written for various movie soundtracks and assemble a new solo album. He needed only to write a few more songs to round out what was supposed to be an invigorating power pop record. Sounds easy enough, right? However, upon employing some dusty synths on the tracks “Your Hologram” and “Only Do,” McCaughan realized that he wanted to use the album, eventually titled Non-Believers, to explore his fascination with that early-’80s era of music when punk evolved into something more introspective, focusing on themes of isolation and eventually turning into post-punk and new wave. As he puts it, he was thinking about a time when bands were “using keyboards and drum machines to relate through their music a disaffection or alienation” from society, school, whatever. However, what really captivated McCaughan was that these artists, particularly British bands like The Cure, OMD, and Cocteau Twins, could end up making such emotionally affecting, even romantic, music when tackling these themes. As McCaughan points out, “I’m constantly discovering and consuming new music, so why does an old New Order song trigger the kind of emotional response that it does?” It certainly seems like he started writing a new batch of songs in order to answer that question. It also became clear that he had to scrap the original batch of songs in order to do it. Sure, the task may sound daunting for a number of reasons. For starters, there’s a certain anxiety about releasing an album under his own name rather than Portastatic, his old moniker. Given that McCaughan comes from the indie and punk rock worlds, he’s always shied away from the perceived hubris of putting out a record under his own name. “There’s something about it that’s way too ‘look at me,’” the singer and songwriter admits. However, given the fact that Non-Believers is exploring such a personal set of influences, putting out an album as simply Mac McCaughan for the first time just makes sense. The record is about a fascination with art that could only be made by someone far from where you are, but who maybe shares the frustrations and awkwardness of youth. It’s about “the irony that comes with being 16 and having a car but not knowing where to go in it, or having a keyboard or a guitar and not knowing how to play it.” McCaughan’s songwriting isn’t limited to sheer nostalgia; it’s also about the more relatable theme of the point when people who grow up feeling alienated and isolated have to choose if and when they are going to join the mainstream, and about the emotional journey tied to weighing those options. “What appeals to me is songs that deal with the messiness and ambiguity that come with any transitional period,” says McCaughan. When writing the songs for Non-Believers, McCaughan had a duo of fictional teen goths in mind and followed them on their journey of growing into adulthood and transitioning into a world they weren’t sure they’d accept. “The important thing is that they’re going through it together,” he says. Upon hearing the spacey opening keyboard notes of “Your Hologram,” it’s hard to resist going on that journey with these kids. Get tickets: ticketf.ly/1zsEwJW themothlight.com/mac-mccaughan-w-flesh-wounds/

3 days ago

Mac McCaughin w/ Flesh Wounds, Impossible Vacation

May 23, 2015, 1:00am

The Mothlight

Superchunk frontman Mac McCaughan was ready to take a collection of unused tracks he had written for various movie soundtracks and assemble a new solo album. He needed only to write a few more songs to round out what was supposed to be an invigorating power pop record. Sounds easy enough, right? However, upon employing some dusty synths on the tracks “Your Hologram” and “Only Do,” McCaughan realized that he wanted to use the album, eventually titled Non-Believers, to explore his fascination with that early-’80s era of music when punk evolved into something more introspective, focusing on themes of isolation and eventually turning into post-punk and new wave. As he puts it, he was thinking about a time when bands were “using keyboards and drum machines to relate through their music a disaffection or alienation” from society, school, whatever. However, what really captivated McCaughan was that these artists, particularly British bands like The Cure, OMD, and Cocteau Twins, could end up making such emotionally affecting, even romantic, music when tackling these themes. As McCaughan points out, “I’m constantly discovering and consuming new music, so why does an old New Order song trigger the kind of emotional response that it does?” It certainly seems like he started writing a new batch of songs in order to answer that question. It also became clear that he had to scrap the original batch of songs in order to do it. Sure, the task may sound daunting for a number of reasons. For starters, there’s a certain anxiety about releasing an album under his own name rather than Portastatic, his old moniker. Given that McCaughan comes from the indie and punk rock worlds, he’s always shied away from the perceived hubris of putting out a record under his own name. “There’s something about it that’s way too ‘look at me,’” the singer and songwriter admits. However, given the fact that Non-Believers is exploring such a personal set of influences, putting out an album as simply Mac McCaughan for the first time just makes sense. The record is about a fascination with art that could only be made by someone far from where you are, but who maybe shares the frustrations and awkwardness of youth. It’s about “the irony that comes with being 16 and having a car but not knowing where to go in it, or having a keyboard or a guitar and not knowing how to play it.” McCaughan’s songwriting isn’t limited to sheer nostalgia; it’s also about the more relatable theme of the point when people who grow up feeling alienated and isolated have to choose if and when they are going to join the mainstream, and about the emotional journey tied to weighing those options. “What appeals to me is songs that deal with the messiness and ambiguity that come with any transitional period,” says McCaughan. When writing the songs for Non-Believers, McCaughan had a duo of fictional teen goths in mind and followed them on their journey of growing into adulthood and transitioning into a world they weren’t sure they’d accept. “The important thing is that they’re going through it together,” he says. Upon hearing the spacey opening keyboard notes of “Your Hologram,” it’s hard to resist going on that journey with these kids. Get tickets: ticketf.ly/1zsEwJW themothlight.com/mac-mccaughan-w-flesh-wounds/

RECORD STORE DAY TOMORROW NBD #RSD15 #stud www.gomnb.com/email/newsletter/1412343015 ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Harvest Records created an RECORD STORE DAY 2015 at HARVEST. ... See MoreSee Less

Another installment of our favorite holiday, RECORD STORE DAY! This Saturday April 18th. We appreciate the YEAR-ROUND support you guys show us, so no worries if you can't make it out Saturday. But if you CAN, we'll make it worth your while. Here's the drill: **We open at 10am. **We will have TONS AND TONS OF LIMITED RELEASES! The packages are just now arriving so we don't know exactly what we will have, but it will be a plethora. No holds or special orders, first come first served! **VIEW THE COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIAL RSD RELEASES at recordstoreday.com **In addition to the tons of limited RSD releases, we'll have tons of super fresh used jams out on the floor as well. Stocking up right now, gonna be big time. **For those hashtaggin' types, the official one is #RSD15 **Thanks to Brent Baldwin for another killer poster design!

1 month ago

RECORD STORE DAY 2015 at HARVEST

April 18, 2015, 10:00am

Harvest Records

Another installment of our favorite holiday, RECORD STORE DAY! This Saturday April 18th. We appreciate the YEAR-ROUND support you guys show us, so no worries if you can't make it out Saturday. But if you CAN, we'll make it worth your while. Here's the drill: **We open at 10am. **We will have TONS AND TONS OF LIMITED RELEASES! The packages are just now arriving so we don't know exactly what we will have, but it will be a plethora. No holds or special orders, first come first served! **VIEW THE COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIAL RSD RELEASES at recordstoreday.com **In addition to the tons of limited RSD releases, we'll have tons of super fresh used jams out on the floor as well. Stocking up right now, gonna be big time. **For those hashtaggin' types, the official one is #RSD15 **Thanks to Brent Baldwin for another killer poster design!

Quick Quilt ticket giveaway for tomorrow! This excellent band (and Transfigs II veterans) are playing our beloved The Mothlight Sunday night, and we want to give away a pair of tickets to one random person who comments on this post. Get on it y'all!! Quilt w/ Luke Norton's Sugarfox, Bad Braids (Philly) ... See MoreSee Less

@[147538548619131:274:Quilt] w/ Luke Norton's Sugarfox & Philly's Bad Braids! When the three members of Quilt arrived in New York City in April to begin the intensive recording process for their second album, the new and aptly named Held in Splendor, they stepped directly into spring. Anna Fox Rochinski, Shane Butler and John Andrews had spent much of the previous several months clutched away at “The Puritan Garage” in Boston’s Charlestown, shielding themselves from a winter of blizzards with the haven of their practice space and a set of fresh songs. Since the release of their 2011 self-titled debut on Mexican Summer, they’d become more than kids just out of college. They’d become a bona fide hard-touring band, with stories to share from the road and experiences to distill into the narrative of new music. Though they continued to write and arrange tunes together, always an essential part of Quilt’s creative process, they brought songs to one another, too, making and modifying demo tapes for the first time. No longer rookies, Quilt began to approach their music like a lifeline. Coming to New York, then, just as the magnolia trees bloomed and the season of new life began to blossom, Quilt got to work. “That was,” says Rochinski, “a magical time to be making a record.” Indeed, when Butler talks about recording the kaleidoscopic Held in Splendor, he seems to speak of an ornate children’s playground. Whereas their first album was made mostly for free and mostly by friends over the course of a year of starts and stops, in sessions that captured the early and elemental and exciting efforts of a band finding its footing, Quilt entered the proper in-house studio located beneath the Mexican Summer offices in Brooklyn for this one. They’d allocated a solid month for recording, and they clocked full days, every day, with Woods member and producer Jarvis Taveniere. The approach was wide-open: They tuned drums and recorded the same song with multiple microphone set-ups. They added bass and invited friends who added saxophone and violin, cello and steel guitar. They built this album together. “We would go in for 10 hours a day, six days a week, and we just made sounds and jokes for the entire time. It was an incredible way to make a record,” Butler says. “We were able to flesh out the songs in crazy ways we’d never imagined: There are all these loop-based drones beneath the songs, and we used more pedals than we’d ever used before.” Held in Splendor is is an audacious pop-rock record with cascading harmonies and billowing textures, punchy rhythms and snarled guitars, wonderful depth and resplendent peaks. “Mary Mountain” takes hazy Summer of Love memories on a mid-summer road trip in a gleaming muscle car. “Tired & Buttered” invites Booker T over for an energy-addled jam in the garage. “The Hollow” twinkles like Fleetwood Mac and Galaxie 500, with sweet singing backed by the lap steel sighs of young acoustic guitar star and longtime Quilt pal Daniel Bachman. Held in Splendor is an album of personal poetry and public questions, confessions and aspirations—really, these 13 tracks are their own playground, brimming with the sort of unapologetic energy and wonder that turns simple songs into absolute anthems. “We’re really attracted to records where each song has its own voice. We wanted to focus on what each song had to say,” Butler explains. “Having the studio, demoing the songs and knowing each other better as musicians helped make that happen. That was a really exciting process for us.” Get tickets: ticketf.ly/1GSStHx themothlight.com/quilt/

2 months ago

Quilt w/ Luke Norton's Sugarfox, Bad Braids (Philly)

April 6, 2015, 1:00am

The Mothlight

Quilt w/ Luke Norton's Sugarfox & Philly's Bad Braids! When the three members of Quilt arrived in New York City in April to begin the intensive recording process for their second album, the new and aptly named Held in Splendor, they stepped directly into spring. Anna Fox Rochinski, Shane Butler and John Andrews had spent much of the previous several months clutched away at “The Puritan Garage” in Boston’s Charlestown, shielding themselves from a winter of blizzards with the haven of their practice space and a set of fresh songs. Since the release of their 2011 self-titled debut on Mexican Summer, they’d become more than kids just out of college. They’d become a bona fide hard-touring band, with stories to share from the road and experiences to distill into the narrative of new music. Though they continued to write and arrange tunes together, always an essential part of Quilt’s creative process, they brought songs to one another, too, making and modifying demo tapes for the first time. No longer rookies, Quilt began to approach their music like a lifeline. Coming to New York, then, just as the magnolia trees bloomed and the season of new life began to blossom, Quilt got to work. “That was,” says Rochinski, “a magical time to be making a record.” Indeed, when Butler talks about recording the kaleidoscopic Held in Splendor, he seems to speak of an ornate children’s playground. Whereas their first album was made mostly for free and mostly by friends over the course of a year of starts and stops, in sessions that captured the early and elemental and exciting efforts of a band finding its footing, Quilt entered the proper in-house studio located beneath the Mexican Summer offices in Brooklyn for this one. They’d allocated a solid month for recording, and they clocked full days, every day, with Woods member and producer Jarvis Taveniere. The approach was wide-open: They tuned drums and recorded the same song with multiple microphone set-ups. They added bass and invited friends who added saxophone and violin, cello and steel guitar. They built this album together. “We would go in for 10 hours a day, six days a week, and we just made sounds and jokes for the entire time. It was an incredible way to make a record,” Butler says. “We were able to flesh out the songs in crazy ways we’d never imagined: There are all these loop-based drones beneath the songs, and we used more pedals than we’d ever used before.” Held in Splendor is is an audacious pop-rock record with cascading harmonies and billowing textures, punchy rhythms and snarled guitars, wonderful depth and resplendent peaks. “Mary Mountain” takes hazy Summer of Love memories on a mid-summer road trip in a gleaming muscle car. “Tired & Buttered” invites Booker T over for an energy-addled jam in the garage. “The Hollow” twinkles like Fleetwood Mac and Galaxie 500, with sweet singing backed by the lap steel sighs of young acoustic guitar star and longtime Quilt pal Daniel Bachman. Held in Splendor is an album of personal poetry and public questions, confessions and aspirations—really, these 13 tracks are their own playground, brimming with the sort of unapologetic energy and wonder that turns simple songs into absolute anthems. “We’re really attracted to records where each song has its own voice. We wanted to focus on what each song had to say,” Butler explains. “Having the studio, demoing the songs and knowing each other better as musicians helped make that happen. That was a really exciting process for us.” Get tickets: ticketf.ly/1GSStHx themothlight.com/quilt/

 
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